Evening Street Press strives to publish words with positive impact

DIY Prison Project​

“I don’t know if you guys are aware of it, but, in prison, books like these are incredibly hard to access. The internet has made it hard for us to learn about books and acquire them, because we can’t access it. The result is that the books we tend to have access to are the kinds of books you might find in a grocery store mixed with a few hood novels and classics from no later than the 1960’s. Perhaps the most ironic example is that prison is the absolute last place you are going to encounter a work on prison abolition or antiracism, but the same problem also applies to experimental works, poetry, creative nonfiction, the works of less well-known writers, works published by small presses, and more modern literary works….”

Our idea is to showcase the work of incarcerated writers. To that end we have a committee made up of prisoners headed by Matthew Mendoza, whose title for his chapbook inspired the name of this project. For privacy reasons, we will not use prison numbers or locations on our website. 

Up to six poems at a time or two prose works are considered as a single submission. When we receive submissions from prisoners, we pass them on to the committee for comment and possible acceptance for publication on our  DIY Reads page. 

Submit to Evening Street Press, 415 Lagunitas Ave #306 , Oakland, CA 94610 or editor@eveningstreetpress.com

Prisoners whose work has appeared or will appear in Evening Street Review:

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Works accepted by the DIY Prison Project reviewers:

Other work appears in links above by author and

Other work can be located by clicking the name of the author's work in the list above

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All orders may also be sent to: 

Evening Street Press,  415 Lagunitas Ave, #306, Oakland, CA 94610
Both personal check or money order are acceptable.

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